Renaissance Combat From The 1595 Club (aka. Historical Fencing or European Martial Arts)

The 1595 Club was founded in Sussex, England in 2002 & is dedicated to the practise, study & re-birth of the lost martial arts of Europe. The aim of the 1595 is a practical & innovative exploration of Saviolos work – his principles, techniques & philosophy; not only of his chosen forms but also the application of these criterion to other weapons, weapon combinations & as the basis for a system of unarmed self-defence & combat. this art to be the beginning and foundation of the art Militarie. Vincentio Saviolo.

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25 Responses to “Renaissance Combat From The 1595 Club (aka. Historical Fencing or European Martial Arts)”

  1. kaindrg Says:

    @NewZealfighter only ill educated ppl regard teh Martial arts as asian look at my old post against the dumbass who used psuedo history and folklores to prove that thre was some VAST unknow cross cultural ? influence on each other.

  2. kaindrg Says:

    @tfo23 i assume u read my post too? ?

  3. kaindrg Says:

    @tfo23 also that s y anthropologist s lable the fighting arts as CULTURAL? univeralis 😀

  4. GregorMar Says:

    Nice but I think that the best white weapon ever is Polish cavalry hussar sabre from 1600’s!!! It is the best fencing weapon ever!!! sabre is too quick, look below how many cuts fencer can give to his opponent during fight in such short? time, any other white weapon: long sword or katana can’t do the same.
    look here:
    /watch?v=pHP4pSQvbxk

    /watch?v=oo0z_R59P8M

    /watch?v=n6IcZnx1flI

    /watch?v=voxErBJyFuw

  5. MurryFolt Says:

    This is completely historically inaccurate!

    They did NOT have video cameras in 1595!

    But seriously though, I liked? it. Nice moves. I enjoy the quickness in it.

  6. Billythewookie Says:

    Considering this is? the fencing of Shakespeare it gives you a good idea of how Hamlet and Laertes could get so tangled that they would switch swords. Using modern fencing or movie fencing just doesn’t work.

  7. Dziordan1 Says:

    This? is Art!

  8. RalphyGreene Says:

    @NewZealfighter eh no one. lol I always heard it was better than asians.
    ?

  9. schizoidboy Says:

    the unarmed style always? reminds me of some kind of Chinese Martial Art. I only see this comparison on YouTube but this observation comes from another site as well that also shows an Italian martial art.

  10. mzambo666 Says:

    Nice!!!!!?

  11. MrCarloArellano Says:

    Impressive and classy. I hope? to visit some day.

  12. tSp289 Says:

    Excellent. I know there’s not much to go on in those volumes but I’m glad someone’s keeping it alive. After doing Aikido for some time? I did try French fencing but got so frustrated that there are so many things you’re not allowed to do (like sidestep or attack exposed knees). I know there’s enormous skill involved in it, but it remains a sport rather than a truly ‘martial’ art

  13. beshkodiak Says:

    Hey tSp289,? Respectfully, if you are not learning quick kill, your “Martial Art” too is a sport. There are those who have trained to make the other guy die for his country and consider that the only “win” and the award is a minute to breath. Trophies and colored belts mean nothing in that instance. However , The skill, and action do make this and your “martial art” beautiful .

  14. Sirdennis89 Says:

    europeans material art are/was? very good.

    Many people think that the european wasn´t a good fighter, because they watch hollywood shit.

    Material Art from Hollywood are so SUCKS.

  15. AndyRaslan Says:

    @tfo23 And I am a practitioner of Wudang Kung Fu and I can confidently say Asian martial arts are overrated, with Shaolin and Japanese Katana techniques being the most deformed and mystified of all? in the perception of the Western public. If you say you’re a black belt, they’ll expect you to punch through a two-meter thick concrete wall with ease and it’s surprising how many people think Katana can cut through other swords like butter.

    IMO, Eastern and Western martial arts are on par.

  16. AndyRaslan Says:

    @tfo23 And I am a practitioner of Wudang Kung Fu and I can confidently say Asian martial arts are overrated, with Shaolin and Japanese Katana techniques being the most deformed and mystified of all in the perception of the Western public. If you say you’re a black belt, they’ll expect you to punch through a two-meter thick concrete wall with ease and it’s surprising how many people think Katana can cut through other swords like butter.

    IMO, Eastern and Western martial arts are on? par.

  17. AndyRaslan Says:

    @tfo23 While it’s true that asian martial arts are generally prettier and more graceful than European martial arts and they make you capable of some pretty impressive feats, this is because they are designed for completely unarmored combat, while, to the (limited) extent of my knowledge (and please correct me if I’m wrong), Western martial arts are descended from armored fighting techniques.

    Even so,? I dread the ability of western martial artists to manipulate the hilt and crossguard of a sword

  18. VALARLIGHT Says:

    Awesome, I’ll be supporting my Western Heritage by joining a Western Martial Arts Club, I just can’t settle on the pretentious and diluted state? that is Eastern Martial arts.

  19. ChishioAme Says:

    @VALARLIGHT Damn straight. My big issue with Eastern martial arts (by which I mean CMA and JMA) is there’s nothing of real substance. All forms are preset movements (not necessarily bad), but there’s no room for derivation and there’s no such thing as sparring or doing anything with intent. Everything is so ritualized that it sucks the life out of the art. And they have centuries of direct lines of teaching! Meanwhile, in WMA, you pick up a weapon, you? get showed a technique, you practice it…

  20. ChishioAme Says:

    @VALARLIGHT And then you use it. Everything is done with intent; you HAVE to have the intent to strike your opponent (as opposed? to going along with a routine at a slow speed) with speed and power and control. If you don’t have that, there’s no point in practicing them. Now, if Japanese and Chinese arts did that, I’d respect them again, but of course they won’t, because that’s not traditional and tradition is more important than spirit to them.

  21. ShakespeareChannel Says:

    Thanks for posting. You may like to see the fencing scene on the first part of my amateur documentary, The? Real Edward de Vere, about the life of the Earl of Oxford who appears in Roland Emmerich’s movie, Anonymous.

  22. AndyRaslan Says:

    I study Chinese martial arts, but I would still love to learn proper Western fencing – it is just superb.? As graceful as the Wudang Sword style is, the rapier…. it’s just… special…

  23. mechupanlamonda Says:

    @ChishioAme ?

  24. foottothenuts Says:

    The? slow motion was REALLY annoying

  25. langying Says:

    @tfo23 Well, the arts that supposedly started? in India refers to Asian styles such as Gong-fu and Karate and so on.

    I’ve come to believe styles like this could be traced back to Greek Pancration or the like, but I might wrong.

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